Um Ala Untez

Learn about the blockade’s impact on:

Electricity Health care Movement Shelter

Um Ala' Untez, who is from the Tuffah neighborhood in Gaza, was interviewed at August Victoria Hospital in Jerusalem, where she was accompanying her sister for a hospital visit.

My sister and I apply for a permit to leave Gaza every 21 days. Permits are only good for one exit.  My sister is undergoing chemotherapy and must come here for 10 treatments because treatment options don’t exist in Gaza. We must apply for permits 10 times.

I live with my son and family in a home that is approximately 100 square meters in area. We just moved back there after two years in an apartment. The house had to be rebuilt after the 2014 war. I share my room with my grandchildren, but I am grateful.

The blockade creates hardships for everyone. The crossing to come for these treatments is humiliating, time consuming, and expensive. I rely on my sister to cover the cost of leaving Gaza.

Um Ala' Untez
Over 30 percent of patients in Gaza who need outside treatment are denied permits to leave or are delayed treatment.

The electricity crisis is very hard. We only have power for four hours of electricity at most. When there is power, I can’t just watch TV or rest. I have to help my daughter-in-law with basic chores, cook, do the laundry, make sure we use the electricity.

I do wish things were different, but God gives us only what we can tolerate and I am still thankful.